link add

link add

Sunday, January 20, 2019

Ambazonia: Cameroon president vows to restore peace in Anglophone region while briefing the press on Friday


The Cameroon government has raised concern over growing insecurity in the country’s anglophone regions.

Speaking while presiding over a graduation a graduation ceremony of the Combined Services Military Academy in Yaounde, President Biya said there were increasing calls across the country for peace and stability to be restored.

“I will spare no effort to ensure that this legitimate aspiration to peace is realized. I reiterate my appeal to our young people who have let themselves be dragged into a dead end to return to the right track,” the president said.

Kidnappings and other criminal activities have been on the rise in the country’s English-speaking regions and the mountainous Adamawa region.

Local authorities said last week Adamawa region was going through its “worst moments” in history with about 150 cases of kidnapping recorded in the region last year.

In the two English-speaking regions of Northwest and Southwest of the largely French-speaking African country, armed separatists have been clashing with government forces to create a nation called “Ambazonia.”


Source: cgtn Africa

UNHCR deplores forced refugee returns from Cameroon


UNHCR, the UN Refugee Agency, is extremely alarmed by reports of the forced return by Cameroon this week of several thousand refugees into violence-affected Borno State in northeast Nigeria. This follows the forced return of 267 Nigerian refugees on 16 January. They had crossed into Cameroon in 2014.  We are gravely concerned for the safety and well-being of all these people.

An estimated 9,000 Nigerians fled across the border into Cameroon earlier in the week after militants attacked and ransacked the small border town of Rann in Nigeria’s Borno State. The militants went on a rampage by targeting military installations, civilians and humanitarian facilities. At least 14 people are reported killed.

“This action was totally unexpected and puts lives of thousands of refugees at risk,” said UN High Commissioner for Refugees Filippo Grandi. “I am appealing to Cameroon to continue its open door and hospitable policy and practices and halt immediately any more returns and to ensure full compliance with its refugee protection obligations under its own national legislation, as well as international law.”

Cameroon is currently home to more than 370,000 refugees, including some 100,000 from Nigeria.

Ambazonia: Human Rights Watch admits that Cameroon faced violence and serious human rights abuses in 2018


Cameroon, a country previously known for its stability, faced violence and serious human rights abuses in 2018. The country endured abusive military operations against a secessionist insurgency in three Anglophone regions, attacks by the Islamic militant group, Boko Haram, in the Far North, and a worsening humanitarian crisis. President Paul Biya, 85, won a seventh seven-year term on October 7.

In the South West and North West, government security forces have committed extrajudicial executions, burned property, carried out arbitrary arrests, and tortured detainees. A Human Rights Watch report documented a range of abuses by both sides in the Anglophone regions, including arson attacks on homes and schools. According to the International Crisis Group, government forces and armed separatists killed over 420 civilians in the regions since the crisis escalated in 2017.

The humanitarian consequences of the Boko Haram attacks and separatist insurgency are of growing concern. As of November, the United Nations estimated that more than 244,000 civilians were displaced in the Far North and  437,500 in the Anglophone North West and South West regions. About 32,600 Cameroonians found refuge in Nigeria. Also, Cameroon has continued to forcibly return Nigerian asylum seekers, fleeing Boko Haram attacks in northeastern Nigeria.

While the government maintained it did not tolerate serious crimes committed by security forces, it failed to demonstrate progress in investigating and punishing them.

On October 22, Cameroon’s Constitutional Council validated Paul Biya’s reelection, with 71.28 percent of the votes. The council’s decision was immediately contested by one of Biya’s rivals, Maurice Kamto, who claimed the results had been altered. In early November, dozens of pro-Kamto protesters were arrested in Bafoussam, Western region. Biya was sworn-in for a seventh term as president on November 6.

The Anglophone Crisis: Abuses on Both Sides

In the Anglophone North West and South West regions, the absence of a genuine political process to address decades-old grievances against the Biya government contributed to the radicalization of the discourse and tactics of Anglophone activists. Since mid-2017, Anglophone separatists have attacked government institutions and threatened, kidnapped, and killed civilians perceived to side with the government.

In 2016 and 2017, government security forces used excessive force against largely peaceful demonstrations organized by members of the country’s Anglophone minority who were calling for increased autonomy for their region. During demonstrations in late 2017, government forces used live ammunition, including from helicopters, against demonstrators and bystanders, killing at least a dozen people and injuring scores. Some individuals detained in the context of the demonstrations were subjected to torture and ill-treatment.

In October 2017, separatist leaders unilaterally declared independence of the North West and South West regions, and the formation of a new nation, Ambazonia. The following month, President Biya announced that Cameroon was under attack from terrorists and vowed to “eradicate these criminals.” The pace and scale of separatists’ attacks against security forces, government workers, and state institutions increased, especially following the arrest and deportation of 47 suspected secessionist activists from Nigeria in January 2018.

Violations by Government Forces

Human Rights Watch found that government forces responded to the growing separatist insurgency by carrying out abusive security operations against communities suspected of supporting secessionist groups. Security forces committed extrajudicial executions, used excessive force against civilians, tortured and abused suspected separatists and other detainees, and burned homes and other property in scores of villages.

During attacks documented by Human Rights Watch, security forces allegedly shot and killed over a dozen civilians, including at least seven people whom witnesses said had intellectual, psychosocial or physical disabilities who did not flee because they were unable or refused to. At least four older women died, burned alive, after security forces set their homes on fire.

Human Rights Watch also documented three cases where security forces detained people suspected of supporting the secessionist cause, and then tortured and killed them in detention. In a fourth case, Human Rights Watch analyzed evidence of torture filmed by perpetrators, who appear to be gendarmes. On September 24 and 27, a total of nine men were allegedly executed by security forces in the town of Buea, according to videos reviewed by Human Rights Watch and a report by the Centre for Human Rights and Democracy in Africa, a local nongovernmental organization (NGO).

Abuses by Armed Separatists: Attacks on Students, Teachers and Schools   

To enforce boycotts of schools following protests by Anglophone teachers against perceived discrimination by the Francophone-dominated national government, separatist groups attacked and burned dozens of schools, threatened teachers, students and parents, kidnapped principals and violently attacked teachers and students. In March, people believed to be armed separatists attacked a high school dormitory in Widikum, North West region, and shot dead Emmanuel Galega, a student.

The pressure tactics forced the majority of schools to close during the 2016-2017 academic year, and as of May 2018 an estimated 42,500 children were still out of school, according to UN Office for Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA). Most schools did not re-open in 2018.

On April 30, Father William Neba, principal of St. Bede’s College, in Ashing near Belo, North West region, was reported abducted while celebrating mass with students. He was released two days later. The school suspended classes on the day of the abduction.  In September, unidentified gunmen attacked a girl’s school in Bafut, North West region, kidnapping five pupils and severely wounding the principal.

In September, the government endorsed the Safe Schools Declaration, an international political agreement to protect education during armed conflict.

On November 5, up to 78 schoolchildren were reportedly kidnapped in Bamenda, North West region, by unknown gunmen. They were released two days later.

Refugee Rights

Cameroon hosts more than 350,000 refugees and asylum seekers, including 260,000 from the Central African Republic and at least 90,000 from Nigeria. Despite its long history of hosting refugees, Cameroon has forcibly returned tens of thousands of Nigerian asylum seekers since 2015. A 2017 Human Rights Watch report documented how soldiers used violence and abuse, including torture, against asylum seekers in remote border regions. Authorities also imposed unlawful restrictions on movement in Cameroon’s only official camp for Nigerian refugees. In August 2018, the UN High Commissioner for Refugees reported that between January and July, Cameroon unlawfully returned at least 800 refugees and asylum seekers to Nigeria.

Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity

Cameroon’s penal code punishes “sexual relations between persons of the same sex” with up to five years in prison. Police and gendarmes continued to carry out arrests and harassment of people they believe to be lesbian, gay, bisexual or transgender (LGBT). In April, police arrested four activists and a security guard at the office of AJO, an organization that works on HIV education with men who have sex with men (MSM), and other vulnerable groups. They spent a week in jail on spurious homosexuality charges before a lawyer secured their release. Cameroonian human rights organizations documented the arrest of at least 25 other men and at least two women on homosexuality charges in the first half of 2018. They also reported numerous cases of physical violence by private citizens targeting LGBT people.

Justice and Accountability

While the government has repeatedly promised to investigate crimes committed by security forces, it has not done so transparently or systematically.

Government officials told Human Rights Watch in June that while they conducted investigations, they did not want to make them public to avoid undermining the morale of government troops. However, the visible lack of accountability appears to have fueled abuses, like arson and torture, rather than ending them.

In July, the government finally granted access to ten Anglophone leaders who had been detained and deported from Nigeria to Cameroon in January. The individuals, held incommunicado for over six months, were permitted to meet their lawyers and the International Committee of the Red Cross.

The government dismissed video footage that emerged in July showing two women and two children being executed by men in uniform in Cameroon’s Far North as “fake news.” Only after an investigation conducted by Amnesty International demonstrated the killings took place in Cameroon did the government announce it had arrested six soldiers suspected of executing the civilians in the video.

Key International Actors

France, the United States, and the United Kingdom are Cameroon’s principal partners, primarily in the context of the counter Boko Haram operations in the country’s Far North region. Both France and the US provide Cameroon with military and security assistance and training.

The US and the UK are the only close allies of Cameroon to have voiced public concern regarding the ongoing situation in the Anglophone regions. The US has continued to provide military aid to Cameroon.

In February, the European Union called for proportionate use of force and accountability for abuses in the Anglophone region.

In September 2018, as the pace and scope of abuses continued to escalate in Cameroon’s Anglophone regions, the UN and African Union issued a joint communiqué calling on the government to facilitate access to humanitarian and human rights organizations and engage in an inclusive dialogue to address the root causes of the crisis.

The UN Security Council in August expressed concern about the situation in Cameroon’s Anglophone regions.


source: hrw

Thursday, January 17, 2019

Cameroon: 30 abducted people regained freedom


At least 30 people abducted by suspected separatists in a troubled English-speaking region of western Cameroon have been released, a security source told AFP.

"The kidnapped people have been freed after being stripped (of their telephones and cash," the source added.

The kidnappings took place on Tuesday on the road between Buea and Kumba" in the Southwest Region, a source close to the authorities there said, confirming an account by a local NGO.

The people were kidnapped after suspected separatists attacked buses on the highway, one of the most dangerous roads in the country.

Since October 2017, the Southwest and neighbouring Northwest Region have been in the grip of an armed revolt by anglophones demanding independence from the majority French-speaking country.

Ransom kidnappings and extortion have proliferated in the two regions, along with attacks on troops and police, plus arson assaults on public buildings and schools.

The government has responded with a crackdown, deploying thousands of soldiers.

More than 200 members of the security forces and at least 500 civilians have been killed since, according to the International Crisis Group think-tank.

According to UN estimates, more than 437,000 people have fled their homes.

The Northwest and Southwest regions were previously ruled by Britain as the Southern Cameroons.

They became incorporated into Cameroon in October 1961, 22 months after France granted the country independence.

Over the years, anglophones have chafed at perceived discrimination at the hands of the francophone majority, especially in law, education and economic opportunities.

Demands for greater autonomy or a return to Cameroon's federal structure were rejected by the central government in Yaounde.

Radicals became ascendant in the anglophone movement, leading to the declaration of the self-described Republic of Ambazonia on October 1, 2017, which has never been recognised internationally.


Dailymail

Five (5) Cameroon soldiers reportedly killed in a recent attack

Ambazonia Defense Forces Battle with Cameroun Military, five Cameroon military men have lost their lives in the battle, no reports of deaths on the side of the Ambazonia Defense Forces.


Kumbo: Ambazonia northern region has seen a new wave of renewed fighting between the Ambazonia Defense Forces (ADF) and the Cameroon military forces in the last twenty-four hours. The fierce battles that have filled the air with uncountable gunshots from both sides and set both camps moving from one end of the area to the other in attacks and counter-attacks are apparently not yet over. The fighting has been ongoing from Melif to Kumbo to Shisong.

Our reporter confirmed that at least five Cameroon military men have lost their lives in the battle and many others wounded. There are no reports of deaths on the side of the Ambazonia Defense Forces.

The atmosphere is still tense with high possibilities of renewed fighting.

From the look of things and the report reaching our news desk, It became evident that Cameroon president Mr Paul Biya’s disarmament commission has not been effective.

Christopher Voss once said “The secret to gaining the upper hand in a negotiation is to give the other side the illusion of control. Don’t try to force your opponent to admit that you are right. Ask questions, that begin with ‘How?’ or ‘What?’ so your opponent uses mental energy to figure out the answer.

The Ambazonian Defence Forces seem to be playing this strategy with one of Africa longest dictator in power. Samira Daoud of Amnesty International West and Central Africa Deputy Regional Director for Campaigns said “People in Cameroon’s Anglophone regions are in the grip of a deadly cycle of violence. Security forces have indiscriminately killed, arrested and tortured people during military operations which have also displaced thousands of civilians.

A source at the frontline who spoke to our reporter said “Threats by the dictator to annihilate the Ambazonian people have fallen on deaf ears as our defence forces remain resilient in the defence of our territory and our lives. It’s our duty to protect the innocent women and children being tortured, raped and killed indiscriminately by the Cameroon military.

A top UN official said humanitarian crises in Central Africa “have not only persisted, but several have grown further” adding that “one in seven people” in the region urgently need assistance and protection compared to one in 70 people globally.

Ghelani said Cameroon’s internally displaced had tripled in the past six months making it “one of the fastest growing displacement crises in Africa.” She added, “The majority of the displaced are hiding in dense forests, without adequate shelter and lacking food, water and basic services; schools and markets are also disrupted, and there are alarming health needs.”

François Louncény Fall, Head of the United Nations Regional Office for Central Africa (UNOCA), told the Security Council that he remained concerned about the situation in the North-West and South-West regions of Cameroon, as violence had not diminished and allegations of human rights violations by the government continued to be reported.

Bertrand Baiye of ABNtv contributed to the verification of the Frontline report.


Izupost

Wednesday, January 16, 2019

Cameroon: Paul Biya quickly chaired the 1st Council of Ministers in 15 minutes

The President of the Republic presided on January 16, 2019, the first Ministerial Council of his seven-year "Great Opportunities". 


The government of the Republic in full was gathered at the Palace of Unity this Wednesday, January 16, 2019 late morning. As usual, this first Council of Ministers of the new septennat, called "Septennat des Grandes Opportunités", lasted only fifteen minutes. The time for Paul Biya, to trace his roadmap to the reorganized government on January 4, 2019.

"The Head of State, the President of the Republic has just sketched out his roadmap. He asked for collegiality; he asked for government solidarity, hard work. He told us that he trusts us to execute this road map, "said Prime Minister Joseph Dion Ngute, at the end of the work.

According to CRTV radio, the state media, the tenant of Etoudi Palace asked his government for the implementation of the measures enacted on November 6, 2018, during his swearing in and on December 31, 2018, in his message of wishes to the Nation. The priority areas are security and peace, improving the living conditions of Cameroonians and better socio-political and economic integration of young people.

"We will apply to the letter what the President of the Republic asks us. There is a budget and an economic program this year, we will apply them to the letter, "added the Head of Government.

Today's Council of Ministers is 12 days after the reshuffle of the government team. The last meeting of Paul Biya and his ministers in this context, dates back to January 15, 2018. It was already 12 days after a reorganization of the government.


Source: cameroon-info.net

Bamenda: a soldier kidnapped and tortured to death by secessionists


A soldier assigned to the Bamenda Fire Department in the North West Region was kidnapped last Monday by separatist fighters.

He was tortured to death by his captors to believe a video published by them on social networks.

Unsustainable images of this video, which our editors chose not to broadcast out of respect for human dignity, showed the torture inflicted on the victim.

We will come back!

Source: camerounweb.com

Ambazonia: Biya's DDR operation scheduled to fail


According to the famous Cameroonian bassist Richard Bona: "If we explain to you Cameroon and you understand, it is because we did not explain you well". Why remember this innocuous fact? Because he is not. In reality, this aphorism rightly reflects what Cameroon's current governance is. The example was once again given on November 30, 2018.

That day, Paul Biya signed a decree (No. 2018/719) creating the National Committee on Disarmament, Demobilization and Reintegration. Article 2 of the Decree stipulates, inter alia, that the CNDDR is responsible for "organizing, supervising and managing the disarmament, demobilization and reintegration of former Boko-Haram combatants and armed groups in the north-west". and the Southwest wishing to respond favorably to the offer of peace of the Head of State by laying down his arms".

As laudable and ambitious as it may be at first glance, this initiative sins by its premature nature and the political malice that accompanies it. Which in relation to the Anglophone crisis effectively condemns it to a bitter failure.

The DDR: What is the name?

There is no standard and canonical definition of DDR. And for good reason!This conflict has its own specificities. Conflict resolution mechanisms must each time take into account the specificities of each conflict or war situation. In this context, a DDR approach must be of a sufficiently flexible and agile nature to claim to respond effectively to its mission. Given this pragmatic and necessary approach, however, the UN stresses that there are at least four prerequisites (common and invariable) without which there can be no DDR.

a) The signing of a peace agreement

The signing of a peace agreement between the belligerents is one of the essential conditions to be fulfilled before embarking on a DDR process.

b) Stakeholder confidence in the peace process

While stakeholder confidence is difficult to assess, it remains a prerequisite for the success of DDR. As the UN points out: "Lack of trust is delaying DDR and the absence of DDR only increases the mistrust of the parties to the peace process. "

c) The willingness of the actors to participate in DDR

The political will of the various actors to collectively undertake the DDR approach is the other necessary precondition for the success of the process.

d) Minimum security guarantees

In the absence of minimum security guarantees, it may be difficult to encourage belligerents to abandon their weapons.

The art of being off-topic

As we have just shown, the DDR process must be preceded by a duly negotiated peace agreement. The prior agreement between the parties provides a legal framework (foundation and robustness) for DDR. To reverse this precedence is to put the cart before the horse; it is plowing the shifting sands of the war, hoping to reap the hypothetical fruits of peace. If not, how can one disarm people to whom all sorts of hidden agendas are indistinctly lent? How can we disarm people to whom we have never deigned to address a word other than contemptuous and condescending? Peace can not be decreed. It is not necessary. It is deeply rooted in social justice and sincere and respectful dialogue.

Although the military response to the Boko-haram sect was highly justified, it is unjustified, counter-productive and untimely as a solution to the Anglophone crisis. It should be recalled that it is the government's repressive response to the social demands of 2016 that has served as a fountain of youth to federalists and formerly secessionist vultures. In this context, the art of being off-topic is to always do the same thing and expect a different result. A radical change of perspective is necessary and urgent. We can not plan to disarm without dialogue. It is a necessary and indispensable precondition. What is more, it will require much more than a multiplication of budget commissions and an incantatory appeal to national unity to re-enchant the sense of belonging to Cameroon. Time is running out ... But is he pressing for everyone? Let me doubt it.

In reality, the weakness of the institutional design of crisis exit as proposed by the Biya government is less amateurish than politicking malice. Doubtless, the strategists of the regime in place know that the Anglophone crisis has settled to last. They also know that Paul Biya is probably no longer part of the solution.Nevertheless, they want to save time and give the impression that the man of November 6th is still acting. More importantly, the Biya regime wants above all to regain control of news and initiative.In doing so, he hopes to move towards the "English-speaking part", the political and military consequences of a possible deterioration of the humanitarian situation.Hostile to any dialogue with the "Ambazonians", Paul Biya nevertheless wants to take on the figure of the architect of peace who faces the apostles of chaos.

In addition, the creation of the CNDDR testifies to what should be called "institutional dustiness". To illustrate my point, I will take the example of the anti-corruption policy. Despite the creation of several bodies responsible for curbing this scourge, it remains haunting and even endemic. The various instances created have at most allowed the regime to place some affidés and give the feeling that it acts.

Mutatis mutandis, it is the same political technology that is used in the management of the Anglophone crisis.The institutional proliferation observed so far has not made it possible to halt the crossfire of arms, made-among other things-in the name of a nation that is no longer one, against a republic that is not one of them. . In fact, 02 years after the creation of the Commission on Bilingualism and Multiculturalism, what can we say? What is its impact in writing a new social contract?

Let's have the lucidity to look reality in the face. The anglophone crisis is nothing more than the trial of fifty years of francophone governance. In fact, the solution to the crisis can only be political. I insist. Administrative science and law can not succeed where politics has deliberately failed. Without real political will, sincere and respectful dialogue, the institutional framework will necessarily be infertile and ineffective. In the current state of the military and political situation, given the will of the newly appointed coordinator, the DDR process is programmed to fail.


Source: Christian Djoko

Cameroon Crisis: 30 killed this weekend


The English-speaking regions of Cameroon were once again the scene of clashes between security forces and secessionists. 30 deaths in the Northwest and South West, only for the last weekend.Two separatists were killed last Friday in Ekona in the South West region. In Sabongari in the north-west, 21 secessionists have been shot by soldiers.The army was returning from an operation in the department at Nkambe in Donga Mantung, when it was ambushed. Exchanges of fire led to this assessment on the side of the separatist group.

The army also confirms the dismantling of a separatist camp in Alabukam and Mankon, on the outskirts of Bamenda last Saturday. In the fly seven separatists were killed. About 10 uniforms of the Rapid Intervention Battalion (BIR), a motorcycle and several weapons of different calibres were seized. This descent resulted in the blocking of the Bamenda-Mbenwi road, Sunday 13 January.


Source: journalducameroun.com

Cameroon Crisis: Bishop Tumi to meet with Anglophones from the diaspora


At a press conference held in Bamenda on Saturday 12 January, officials acknowledged that their consultations had been flawed and that they were changing the way they worked so that all parties could find a place within the organization. organization.

"We agree that enough consultations have not been conducted, which is why we are sending missions to America, Europe and the rest of the country ... as soon as we get the results of the extensive consultation mission, a date and venue for the conference will be announced immediately, "said Cardinal Tumi.

The press conference was the occasion to announce the arrival of the Executive President of the Baptist Convention of Cameroon, Reverend Godwill Ncham.

It should be recalled that the English General Conference has had two major adjournments since the idea was conceived in July 2018 and no particular date has been set since its postponement in late 2018.


Source: 237actu.com

Cameroon Crisis: Honorable Wirba Joseph advice to Paul Biya


The hon. Member for Jakiri, Hon. Joseph Wirba urged the English-speaking diaspora to unite to face the plight of the victims of the socio-political crisis in the northwest and southwest.

He released the call this weekend in the United Kingdom when he released his book "Wirbaforce", which chronicles his experiences of the crisis that has shaken the regions of north-west and south-west of Cameroon since 2016.

The English-speaking community of the diaspora played a leading role in the events that took place here, but divergent voices among the various groups made it difficult to create a common platform for possible dialogue with the government, as appropriate.

A situation that Hon. Wirba was keen to speak at the launch of his book, pointing out that a united Anglophone front would seek a common goal.

"If you do not meet immediately, discuss and do things right, wait for the consequences. You have no choice but to meet immediately, "warned Wirba, calling for a collaborative platform where all opinions would be solicited before adopting the best path forward.

Hon. Wirba, who has been exiled to the UK since the end of 2018, also took the opportunity to chastise the alleged English-speaking Diaspora leaders who put money into play to cause loss of life.


Source: 237act.com

Cameroon: If you fight for me, do not fight anymore - Maurice Kamto


After a marathon tour in the regions of the West and Littoral, Saturday, January 12 and Sunday, January 13, Maurice Kamto returned Tuesday, 15, by a meeting with officials of the base of the Movement for the rebirth of Cameroon (MRC) political formation which he is the leader, as well as wishes to the national and international press. An opportunity for the politician to send a poignant message to his compatriots, via his comrades, but also by using the mediators that are the information professionals.

The former presidential candidate of October 2018 who repeated to the envy last weekend that Cameroonians should stop relying on others to recover their confiscated freedom, and that they can not do it. that through sacrifices, ("We can not go to heaven without dying") came back on the occasion of this meeting on the need for Cameroonians to fight against for the appropriation of civil rights which is before all their own, that makes it the reappropriation of their primacy, of their sovereignty over their leaders.

Also, addressing the communal, departmental and regional Center-Southeast of his party, Maurice Kamto recommended them to fight for the future of Cameroon and not for his person.

"If you fight for me, Maurice Kamto, do not fight anymore. Let's fight for a cause that is above everyone else. Yes, let's fight for Cameroon, "said the man who continues to claim his victory" stolen "in the last presidential election and attributed to one of his opponents outgoing incumbent President Paul Biya.

A real incentive to disinterestedness for Cameroonians in general and his supporters in particular that call Maurice Kamto who recommended: "Do not sow with the conviction that we will reap . If we do not harvest, our descendants will reap, or failing that, passers-by. " But also a psychological preparation for the march announced for January 26 in Yaounde against the electoral heist, whose most remarkable challenger Paul Biya in the last presidential election said he will personally take the lead.


Source: cameroonvoice.com

Thursday, January 10, 2019

Ambazonia: dead city 'declared' as Ayuk Tabe appears in court today


English-speaking Diaspora activists and secessionist fighters in English-speaking regions have declared Thursday, January 10, a dead city in the English-speaking area of ​​the country.

In a briefing note circulating early this week, the acting president of the virtual state of ambazonia invited all residents of English-speaking areas to stay at home.According to Samuel Sako, every time he has an English-speaking audience incarcerated in the context of the Anglophone crisis, this day will be declared a ghost town.

In addition, separatist fighters have threatened to burn tires along city roads to avoid any economic activity.

Self-proclaimed President of Ambazonia, name of the independent state that the separatists want to create in English-speaking Cameroon, Mr. Ayuk Tabe and 46 other English-speaking activists were arrested in Nigeria then extradited at the end of January in Cameroon.

Recall that these separatist leaders had rejected during their previous trial on December 6, the Cameroonian nationality before the military court of Yaounde.


Source: 237actu.com

Ambazonia: Nigeria criticized for handing over Cameroonian separatist leaders to Paul Biya


The Federal Government of Nigeria has been sharply criticized for delivering Cameroonian separatist leaders into the hands of the government of President Paul Biya in a move seen as very unusual in international diplomacy.

The Nigerian government on Friday, January, 2018 deported 12 Cameroonian separatist leaders who were arrested earlier in the month, their lawyer said Monday.

Julius Ayuk Tabe and 11 others were arrested at Nera Hotels Abuja on 6 January and were detained at the Defence Intelligence Agency, said Femi Falana who has been providing legal support for them.

The detainees were largely held incommunicado, which included denial of access to their lawyers, doctors and family members.

However, the deputy representative of the office of United Nations Commissioner for Refugees to Nigeria and ECOWAS, Brigitte Mukanga-Eno, was allowed to visit them in detention last week, Mr Falana said.

The treatment prompted the lawyer to file a fundamental rights suit to enforce the rights of their clients. However, the deportations were carried out before the conclusion of the court case.

The Buhari administration was criticised for arresting the leaders in a defiant departure from Nigeria’s longstanding policy of being sympathetic towards freedom fighters.

Nigeria was widely praised for its support for the struggle against apartheid in South Africa.

Falana said that the Nigerian government was ashamed to announce the deportation, which is being celebrated by Cameroonian authorities as a major victory in their clampdown on Ayuk Tabe and other leaders of the self-proclaimed Ambazonia state in the English-speaking parts of Cameroon.

About 39 other Ambasonian separatist leaders who were detained in Taraba were also reported to have been sent back to Cameroon on Friday by the Nigerian government.

Cameroonian authorities said they have the men and vowed to put them through a thorough trial for their alleged offences.

“The group of 47 terrorists, among them Mr Ayuk Tabe, has for some hours been in the hands of Cameroonian justice, before which they will answer for their crimes,” Cameroonian Communications Minister Issa Tchiroma Bakary said in a statement reported by Reuters Monday.

Mr Falana condemned the deportation as “contemptuous of the proceedings pending before the Federal High Court” and many analysts also condemn the action of the Nigerian government as the agitators would not be given free trial.

“It’s wrong for our government to hand over people who have sought refuge in our country to their enemies,” said a public commentator on the issue. Nigeria should have best allowed the agitators to leave for a third country, is the opinion of most political and legal analysts.

Over the past year, there has been mounting tension in Cameroon’s Southwest and Northwest regions — home to anglophones who account for about a fifth of the West African nation’s population of 23 million.

English-speakers complain they have suffered decades of economic inequality and social injustice at the hands of the French-speaking majority.

Ayuk Tabe is campaigning for the two English-speaking regions of Cameroon to separate from the French-speaking part of the country.


Kola Tella

Ambazonia: Nigeria criticized for handing over Cameroonian separatist leaders to Paul Biya


The Federal Government of Nigeria has been sharply criticized for delivering Cameroonian separatist leaders into the hands of the government of President Paul Biya in a move seen as very unusual in international diplomacy.

The Nigerian government on Friday, January, 2018 deported 12 Cameroonian separatist leaders who were arrested earlier in the month, their lawyer said Monday.

Julius Ayuk Tabe and 11 others were arrested at Nera Hotels Abuja on 6 January and were detained at the Defence Intelligence Agency, said Femi Falana who has been providing legal support for them.

The detainees were largely held incommunicado, which included denial of access to their lawyers, doctors and family members.

However, the deputy representative of the office of United Nations Commissioner for Refugees to Nigeria and ECOWAS, Brigitte Mukanga-Eno, was allowed to visit them in detention last week, Mr Falana said.

The treatment prompted the lawyer to file a fundamental rights suit to enforce the rights of their clients. However, the deportations were carried out before the conclusion of the court case.

The Buhari administration was criticised for arresting the leaders in a defiant departure from Nigeria’s longstanding policy of being sympathetic towards freedom fighters.

Nigeria was widely praised for its support for the struggle against apartheid in South Africa.

Falana said that the Nigerian government was ashamed to announce the deportation, which is being celebrated by Cameroonian authorities as a major victory in their clampdown on Ayuk Tabe and other leaders of the self-proclaimed Ambazonia state in the English-speaking parts of Cameroon.

About 39 other Ambasonian separatist leaders who were detained in Taraba were also reported to have been sent back to Cameroon on Friday by the Nigerian government.

Cameroonian authorities said they have the men and vowed to put them through a thorough trial for their alleged offences.

“The group of 47 terrorists, among them Mr Ayuk Tabe, has for some hours been in the hands of Cameroonian justice, before which they will answer for their crimes,” Cameroonian Communications Minister Issa Tchiroma Bakary said in a statement reported by Reuters Monday.

Mr Falana condemned the deportation as “contemptuous of the proceedings pending before the Federal High Court” and many analysts also condemn the action of the Nigerian government as the agitators would not be given free trial.

“It’s wrong for our government to hand over people who have sought refuge in our country to their enemies,” said a public commentator on the issue. Nigeria should have best allowed the agitators to leave for a third country, is the opinion of most political and legal analysts.

Over the past year, there has been mounting tension in Cameroon’s Southwest and Northwest regions — home to anglophones who account for about a fifth of the West African nation’s population of 23 million.

English-speakers complain they have suffered decades of economic inequality and social injustice at the hands of the French-speaking majority.

Ayuk Tabe is campaigning for the two English-speaking regions of Cameroon to separate from the French-speaking part of the country.


Kola Tella

Felix Tshisekedi declared president-elect of DR Congo


Felix Tshisekedi is the president-elect of the Democratic Republic of Congo after he was declared winner of the December 30, 2018; presidential elections in the hours of Thursday morning.

The elections board, CENI declared the former son of serial opposition leader Etienne Tshisekedi as winner of a poll in which he led a coalition that included another political heavyweight, Vital Kamerhe.

He beat two main opponents, Martin Fayulu of the Lamuka coalition and Emmanuel Ramazani Shadary – candidate for the ruling coalition.

The announcement effectively means that incumbent Kabila’s stay in office is just a number of days. He will be winding down his over seventeen years in charge of the vast mineral-rich but security wracked and poverty-stricken central African country.

Wednesday, January 9, 2019

Buea: Mayor Patrick Ekema visiting ghost town areas with tight security


The frown Mayor seems not to be happy at all after his people caught respecting the usual Monday ghost town in the city of Buea.


Ekema Patrick spotted parading the street with security guards as seen in the photo above.

Gabon Closes Border With Cameroon After Failed Coup Attempt


Gabon has closed border crossings with Cameroon since Monday's attempted coup against President Ali Bongo, halting trade and leaving Gabonese unable to return home. Goods and passengers destined for Gabon are stranded in Cameroon’s border town of Kiossi.

Trucks loaded with plantain, cocoyam, groundnuts, and other vegetables sit idle along with several hundred commuters in the town of Kiossi, on Cameroon’s southern border with Gabon.

Gabonese businessman Luc Eyene says Gabon’s border troops stopped him from crossing over from Cameroon. The government ordered the closure to protect civilians, Eyene says they told him, after Monday’s attempted coup against ailing President Ali Bongo.

He says even though Gabon is in a political crisis that could turn violent if Bongo does not recover, it is unpardonable for anyone to seal the border. It is known by everyone that Gabon depends on Cameroon for food, says Eyene. The poor are already suffering after just 24 hours of the border being closed, he says.

Traders like Eyene fear their perishable goods will not last until the border reopens.

Cameroonian businesswoman Caroline Ndifor supplies farm produce to Gabon. She says she was forced to make arrangements to take her goods to Equatorial Guinea instead.

"We are just suffering because of the control that they are blocking Gabonese. There are four control (check points), even more than four, so they are blocking Gabonese. Business is not moving here."

Handerson Quetong Konge is the highest ranking Cameroonian official along the border with Gabon. He says they have been discussing re-opening the border with Gabonese authorities in the town of Bitam, just across the border.

"We are in full discussions with my colleagues in Bitam to see how we can facilitate transit in these border towns," said Konge.

Silvanus Mba, a member of Gabon’s main opposition group, The Coalition for the New Republic, was traveling in Cameroon when the border was closed. He says his group does not have links with the rebels but added that many Gabonese, including himself, would have celebrated if the coup had succeeded.

He says Gabon belongs to all the people of Gabon, not an individual whose family has ruled for over 51 years and is not showing signs of leaving power even when his health is failing him. Ali Bongo should know that there are very competent citizens of Gabon who can lead the country out of misery, says Mba.

The rebel troops appeared on state television early Monday, announcing the coup was intended to restore democracy.

But by Monday night the government of Gabon said it had regained control and arrested seven rebel soldiers. Government forces killed two other soldiers involved in the coup attempt.

Authorities also cut the internet and imposed a curfew on Gabon’s capital, Libreville. Tanks and armored vehicles were patrolling the city and airports were shut down.

In this image from TV, a soldier who identified himself as Lt. Obiang Ondo Kelly, commander of the Republican Guard, reads a statement on state television broadcast from Libreville, saying the military has seized control of the government, Jan. 7, 2019.

President Bongo has been in Morocco since October receiving treatment for a stroke. He acknowledged having health problems in a New Year’s Day message.

Bongo succeeded his father Omar Bongo as president in 2009 and narrowly won re-election in a 2016 poll marred by violence and accusations of fraud.

His family has been accused of profiting off the country's natural resources while Gabon’s two million citizens struggle to meet their everyday needs.

Monday, January 7, 2019

Ambazonia: how leaders were arrested at Abuja hotel on January 5, 2018, Nsoh Nalova Bih speaks out


My name is Nsoh Nalova Bih, I was 1 of the 12 Ambazonian activists who gathered at the Nera Hotel in Abuja on January 5, 2018. Here is MY STORY on how we were abducted, why I was not taken to Cameroon with the Nera10 to face bogus terrorism charges

On that fateful day, we had gathered in Abuja to discuss the growing refugee crisis in the Cross River State of Nigeria caused by the war that President Biya had declared on the people of Southern Cameroons.

The group consisted of Profs, Lawyers, Teachers: Sisiku Ayuk Tabe, Prof. Awasum Augustin, Dr Henry Kimeng, Deacon Tassang Wilfred, Dr. Fidelis Ndeh-Che, Dr Conerlius Kwanga, Dr Ogork Ntui, Eyambe Elias, SHUFAI Bliase, Nfor Ngalla Nfor, Dr OJONG & myself.

We had barely settled downed when a group of unidentified heavily armed men appeared, handcuffed and blindfolded us, and took us to an unknown destination. All i could remember was that we drove for hours.

When we arrived at our destination, all I can remember is that I was still with the 11 others. Our abductors then took us from the car, one after the other. I was searched & taken to a cell. This was a Friday.

On Monday morning, a girl walked in and blindfolded me then took me to a dark room where I was questioned. I refused to answer. I was fingerprinted, and my picture taken.

Two wks later, I was once again blindfolded and taken to a car where I realized that I was with the other 11 male ACTIVISTS. I knew who they were despite the blindfold because I recognized them from their voices.

When we got to our destination, we were told to remove our blindfolds, which we did. We were then ushered into a building which turned out to be the offices of UNHCR Nigeria. This was on January 18, 2018.

Being at the UNHCR was a huge relief given that 4 of the abducted activists were legally recognized Refugees in Nigeria, while 6 others had their applications pending, the coming of the UNHCR was a relief.

Nigeria assured us that they were working with the Nigeria government to secure our release. This was the first confirmation that the Nigerian government was behind our abduction, although we still did not know why.

On Jan 25, 2018, at about 4pm, I was again blindfolded and taken to a car where I heard the voices of my friends again. We drove for quite a while before getting to our destination.

Upon arrival, we were asked to remove our blindfolds & behave. Only then did we realize we were on our way to Nnamdi Azikiwe Intl. Airport, Abuja. When Sisiku Ayuk asked where we were going, we were told "back home". We didn't know what home meant.

When we got to the airport, a Cameroun military plane was waiting for us. We realized we'd been abducted by military & held by the Defence Intelligence Agency. How could we fight back? They were heavily armed & looked ready to shoot anyone who resisted.

When we were ordered to board the plane, Dr. Ojong  objected saying 2 among the 12 activists were of Nigerian descent, that is, he and myself. The BIR officers alighted from the plane and insisted that they had come to pick up 12 not 10 of them.

After hours of discussions, 2 of us were finally left behind while the 10 others boarded the plane. The Nigerian govt had just violated its own laws, while unhcrnigeria had failed in its mission to protect the vulnerable asylum seekers.

Dr. Ojong and I were taken back to the DIA and locked up until Feb. 20, 2018 when we were finally transferred to Asokoro police station.

On Feb. 25, 2018, I had a miscarriage while in detention. I was 3 months & 2 weeks pregnant. It was due to this miscarriage that I was granted bail on a 1-million-naira bond  and had to be reporting to a Police Station.

Our abduction & the forcible/illegal transfer of 10 of us to Cameroon was a watershed moment that violated Nigerian law, international refugee law, & basic human rights. This travesty must be corrected with #Justice4Nera10 via their immediate and unconditional release. 

Sunday, January 6, 2019

Falana drags Cameroon to African Commission over trial of asylum seekers


Nigeria’s foremost human rights lawyer Femi Falana SAN has dragged the government of Cameroon to the African Commission on Human and Peoples’ Rights in Banjul, The Gambia over the impending trial of 47 asylum seekers and naturalised Nigerians.

The lawyer wants the commission’s urgent intervention to end “the ongoing human rights violations of the applicants who were forcibly returned to Cameroon by the Nigerian authorities.”

See also:

Falana is asking “the Chairperson and the Bureau to urgently hold an extra-ordinary session of the African Commission to address the illegal and unfair return of 47 refugees and asylum seekers, and the continuing violations of the rights of the returnees by the government of Cameroon.

See also:

“We also urge the Chairperson of the Commission to speak out strongly and condemn the unfair treatment of the returnees by the government of Cameroon, and request the government to immediately release them from unlawful detention.”

The petition read in part: “Cameroon has ratified the African Charter on Human and Peoples’ Rights and United Nations Convention Relating to the Status of Refugees. At the request of the Government of Cameroon the Nigerian authorities illegally and unfairly returned 47 refugees and asylum seekers to Cameroon on Friday, January 26, 2018. The returnees are mostly leaders of the people of Southern Cameroon and who have been living in Nigeria with their families for years.”


“Some of them have been granted political asylum while others were asylum seekers in Nigeria. On Saturday, 7th January 2018, the Applicants assembled to meet in Abuja to discuss the problems being encountered by several Cameroonian asylum seekers in Nigeria but before the commencement of the meeting security personnel from Nigeria arrested the Applicants and took them to an underground detention centre in a military barracks in Abuja.”

“While the Applicants were detained in Nigeria, they were denied access to their family members, friends, lawyers and doctors. However, the representative of the United Nations Commissioner for Refugees was allowed to visit the Applicants.”

“When the Applicants’ lawyers received information of the plan to deport them to Cameroon, they rushed to the Federal High Court in Abuja to stop the illegal plan. The Applicants also reached out to the Comptroller-General of Immigration, the Minister of Foreign Affairs and the office of the United Nations Commissioner for Refugees in Nigeria.”

“As soon as the Office of the United Nations Commissioner for Refugees in Nigeria confirmed the information it dispatched a letter to the government of Nigeria pointing out that Nigeria has a legal obligation under international law not to deport the detained Cameroonians.”

“But in a demonstration of reckless impunity, the government of Cameroon pressured the Nigerian authorities to hand over the refugees. They were handed over to the Cameroonian security forces who forcefully took them away from Nigeria on Friday, January 26, 2018.”

“On account of the illegality of the deportation, the government of Nigeria could not announce that the refugees had been expelled from Nigeria but the Government of Cameroon decided to celebrate the deportation and threatened to prosecute the deportees for terrorism. We submitted a letter to the Office of the High Commissioner of Cameroon to Nigeria in Abuja to request for access to the Applicants who are currently held incommunicado in Cameroon. The request has to date not been granted by Cameroon.”

“Nigeria has no extradition treaty with Cameroon. Hence, the deportation was carried out outside the ambit of the extradition laws of Nigeria and Cameroon and the African Charter on Human and Peoples’ Rights.”

“In removing the Applicants from Nigeria, the government of Cameroon breached the human rights of the Applicants to enter Nigeria, reside, seek and obtain asylum guaranteed by Article 12 (3) of the African Charter on Human and Peoples’ Rights. The government of Cameroon also breached article 12 (4) of the African Charter, which provides that every individual shall have the right, when persecuted to seek and obtain asylum in other countries in accordance with the laws of those countries and international conventions.”

“Apart from the violation of the African Charter, the government of Cameroon breached its legal obligations under the 1951 United Nations Convention Relating to the Status of Refugees and the 1969 Organization of African Unity Convention on Refugees and which have guaranteed the rights of refugees and asylum seekers in Nigeria to protection.”

“The Applicants are the leaders of the movement agitating for the creation of the Republic of Ambazonia from Cameroon. In 2002, the Applicants filed a suit at the Federal High Court in Abuja to determine whether the people of Southern Cameroon were not entitled to self-determination within their clearly defined territory separate from the Republic of Cameroon. The government of Nigeria decided to settle the case out of court.”

“By a consent judgment delivered by the Court on March 5, 2002, the government of Nigeria agreed to file a suit at the International Court of Justice to have a judicial confirmation of the human right of the people of Southern Cameroon to self-determination. The government of Nigeria also undertook to take other measures as may be necessary to place the case of the people of Southern Cameroon for self-determination before the United Nations General Assembly and other international organizations.”

“The Applicants are not soldiers, but civilians. Even though they are not military men, the government of Cameroon has decided to try them before a military tribunal. The military tribunal to try the Applicants has since been constituted by the government of Cameroon.”

“Upon the arrival of the Applicants in Cameroon and without any investigation whatsoever, the government of Cameroon announced that they would be tried for terrorism. The Applicants have been detained illegally from January –November, 2018.”

“The Applicants have since been arraigned for terrorism before a military tribunal specially constituted for the purpose of persecuting them even though they have never engaged in terrorist activities in Cameroon.”

“The trial of the Applicants is scheduled to commence in Cameroon on January 10, 2019 whereas their lawyers who are based in Nigeria have been denied access to them and the opportunity to defend them.”

“It is the case of the Applicants that they had left Cameroon with their families and have been living in Nigeria where that had applied for asylum. Thus, by removing them from Nigeria the government of Cameroon has separated the Applicants from their family members who have been left behind in Nigeria.”

“The government of Cameroon is also reportedly violating the rights of the 47 returnees to personal liberty, freedom of movement (including the right to leave their country), fair trials, freedom of expression and depriving them of their liberty to be treated with humanity and respect for the inherent dignity of the human person. The situation in Cameroon is characterised by widespread and massive violations of human rights and humanitarian law with growing numbers of victims lacking access to an effective remedy.”

“The government of Cameroon’s treatment of the 47 returnees falls with the ‘worst crimes’ of the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court, which in article 7 defines crimes against humanity to mean acts such as deportation, imprisonment or other severe deprivation of liberty in violation of fundamental rules of international law, torture and other similar acts that are committed as part of a widespread or systematic attack directed against any civilian population.”

“I therefore urge the African Commission to consider the present Complaint under Articles 6, 7, 11, and 12 of the African Charter and to hold that violations of these provisions have occurred in the case of the Applicants. I further urge the African Commission to undertake an in-depth study, based on the “series of serious” and “massive” violations alleged in this Communication such as right to freedom of assembly.”

“The Applicants are filing this Application/Communication with the African Commission because no adequate or effective domestic remedies exist to address the violations alleged in this Communication.”

“Generally, local remedies must be exhausted prior to submitting a Communication to the Commission. There are, however, exceptions to this general rule. The African Commission has stated that local remedies must be available, effective and sufficient. A local remedy is considered available if the petitioner can pursue it without impediment, it is effective if it offers a prospect of success and it is sufficient if it is capable of redressing the complaint. Given the on-going human rights crisis in the country, it is impossible to exhaust domestic remedies in Cameroon.”

“In the light of the forgoing, the Applicants hereby urge the African Commission on Human and Peoples Rights to: Urgently hold an extra-ordinary session of the African Commission to address the illegal and unfair return of 47 refugees and asylum seekers, and the continuing violations of the rights of the returnees by the government of Cameroon; Hold the government of Cameroon to account for violating the rights of the 47 naturalised Nigerians, refugees’ and asylum seekers’ rights to freedom from torture and other human rights.”

“The Commission should make an official visit to Cameroon with special rapporteurs having relevant mandates and put pressure on the authorities to immediately release the returnees from unlawful detention and end the politically motivated trial of naturalised Nigerians, refugees and asylum seekers.”

“The Commission should hold that the continuing detention, mistreatment and unfair trial of the returned naturalised Nigerians, refugees and asylum seekers by the government of Cameroon amount to cruel and degrading treatment and in conflict with the country’s human rights obligations, including under the African Charter on Human and Peoples’ Rights and the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights.”

“The Commission should seek the guarantee of government of Cameroon about the safety of the returnees, and that they would afford the returnees fair trial while they remain in the country. Pursuant to Rules 84(2) and 118(3)(4) of the Rules of Procedure, the Commission should refer the matter to the African Court on Human and Peoples’ Rights.”

“The Commission should ask the government of Cameroon to immediately stop the mistrial of the 47 refugees and asylum seekers before a military tribunal and return them to Nigeria to rejoin their families.”

Diaspora: Ambazonians protest in Toronto


The #Nera10 protest successfully took place in Toronto.

See also:


Ambazonians living in Toronto came together to have a peaceful protest, demanding the French Cameroon government to release leaders arrested in Abuja, Nigeria a year ago. See more photos below

#toronto#Nera10


 

Cameroon: Tenor and Nabila are probably in love


They are young, they are talented, they would be in pairs to believe the photo that Tenor to publish, we see him arm in arm with the charming Nabila, in short it looks like a pure ndole.

See also:


A few days ago the artist signed to UMA (Universal Music Africa) said he should officially present his wife, the one who will now share his life; and it was the sweet and fresh Nabila! Unless this photo (below) was filmed in order to make the buzz.

See also:


In all we go except that Wait, a proverb says "what rot will eventually feel"

Update soon...

Source: kamermoov.cm

Saturday, January 5, 2019

Paul Biya: Why the Swiss government won’t stop his Geneva stays

Reports in 2018 that alleged Cameroon’s president Paul Biya runs his country from a Geneva hotel raise questions whether official Switzerland can intervene in such cases.   


Neutral Switzerland, and international Geneva in particular, have long been known as a playground for the rich. But should the Swiss clamp down when some of these people, like Biya, are linked to regimes with dubious democratic records in corrupt countries?

According to a report in early 2018 by the Organized Crime and Corruption Reporting (OCCRP), the Cameroonian president has spent at least 1,645 days on private visits abroad since he came to power in 1982, and Geneva is by far his favourite destination The Hotel Intercontinental in Geneva with its swimming pool and view of Mont Blanc is the residence of choice for the Cameroonian presidential couple.

“According to reporters’ conservative calculations – based on publicly available hotel room prices and a compilation of entourage lists – the total hotel bill of Biya and his colleagues for one stay at Intercontinental adds up to around $40,000 per day,” says OCCRP. “At that rate, the cost of all of the president’s private trips (1,645 days in total) would add up to about $65 million since he came to power – and that’s not counting food, entertainment and the rental of a private plane.”

A report by the Wall Street Journal in November 2018 said that since Biya became head of state the hotel is transformed several times a year into a kind of offshore presidential palace for several weeks. According to the WSJ, Biya pays for everything in cash. A normal stay costs several million Swiss francs (about the same in US dollars), according to Christian Penda Ekoka, who was Biya’s chief advisor before moving to the opposition. Ekoka told the WSJ that the money came directly from the treasury, and that everything was paid in cash to prevent the trips appearing in the state account.

Cameroonian protestors

Another report by Swiss public broadcaster RTS (in French) in June this year also highlighted Geneva as a “paradise for dictators”. It includes some scenes of the frequent demonstrations by Cameroonian exiles outside the Hotel Intercontinental when Biya is there. “Shame on Switzerland!” they cry. “It’s taxpayers’ money!” “He is stealing the money from the oil of our anglophone region, which is in ruins.”

Cameroon has a reputation for corruption. In 1998 and 1999 it was ranked bottom of the Transparency International Corruption Perceptions Index, and in 2017 it was rated 153rd out of 180 countries. Although Biya is recognized as the legitimate president of Cameroon, his democratic credentials are questionable. The francophone president, 85, won re-election for a seventh term this October in what foreignpolicy.com called a “master class in fake democracy”. That election took place amid an upsurge of rebellion in the country’s anglophone regions, which has been violently repressed by his security forces.

According to the International Crisis Group, “Cameroon’s structural weaknesses (hyper-centralisation, no separation of powers, restriction of civil liberties, corruption of state officials, weak institutions and failure to renew its leadership) are becoming more problematic each passing year. President Paul Biya, in power for 36 years, governs through a combination of clientelism, manipulation of ethnic rivalries and routine human rights violations.”

So what should Switzerland do?

So is Biya’s frequent presence in Geneva an embarrassment for Switzerland, and should it act? “Foreign heads of state can - in a private capacity - stay in Switzerland without the federal authorities being formally informed or involved in the visit," the foreign ministry told swissinfo.ch.

“As a legitimate head of state, he has a right to travel, especially to Geneva which is the seat of many international organizations,” says Marc Guéniat, Senior Researcher at Swiss NGO Public Eye. “What is problematic is that he spends so much time at taxpayers’ expense, taking over an entire floor of a 5-star hotel.”

According to the Wall Street Journal, which spoke to several former hotel managers, the Intercontinental vacates the entire sixteenth floor for Biya and his entourage, sometimes adding around 30 rooms on other floors.

“He’s not wanted by Interpol, so it’s not a legal question,” says analyst Daniel Warner, a retired former deputy head of the Geneva Institute of International and Development Studies. “Unless he’s on trial somewhere, it’s a political question and a judgment question, and as a neutral country what do you expect the Geneva or Swiss authorities to do? If he’s wanted for a crime, that would be something different, but there is no formal legal process against him.”

Some people nevertheless think Switzerland could do more, starting with tighter checks on visas and on cash coming into the country. One angry Cameroonian demonstrating outside the Geneva Intercontinental in the RTS report tells a Swiss police officer that if Biya “has come to live in Switzerland” he should ask for his residence permit like everyone else.

Asked what the visa regulations are for non-European heads of state visiting Switzerland, the foreign ministry told swissinfo.ch that “when a head of State comes on a private visit to Switzerland he is subject to the same rules as any other foreigner staying in Switzerland”. It did not, however, directly answer the question of who delivers the visas and how long such heads of state are allowed to stay.

Cash rules

Unlike the EU, Switzerland does not automatically require a declaration when importing large amounts of cash. However, under an Ordinance of 2009, Swiss customs officials can request information “on the import, export and transit of cash in an amount of at least CHF10,000 or an equivalent amount in foreign currency”, including the reasons and origin of the money. If there is suspicion of money laundering or terrorist financing, the customs office can also request information when the amount of cash is less than CHF10,000 ($10,000).

As a head of state, Biya enjoys diplomatic immunity. This was confirmed by the foreign ministry. “A sitting head of state enjoys, according to international customary law, absolute legal immunity (for both public and private acts) and personal inviolability,” the ministry said in response to swissinfo.ch. “As for the members of his entourage, the statute they may be granted in Switzerland is examined on a case by case basis, according to the aim of the visit and the function they perform.”

Brazil recently seized millions of dollars from the luggage of a delegation accompanying Teodorin Obiang Nguema, the playboy Vice-President of Equatorial Guinea who is also a frequent visitor to Switzerland. But “Teodorino”, unlike Biya, has a court ruling against him. He was sentenced in France in absentia in October 2017 to a suspended three-year prison sentence for money laundering. And in that case, the Swiss authorities seized luxury cars and a yacht belonging to him, at the request of the French authorities.


By Julia Crawford with input from Markus Spoerndli

2019 Cabinet Reshuffle: here are the 16 new ministers appointed, 20 maintained


The Head of State has  reshuffled the government this 4th January 2019. Sixteen new ministers have joined the government, and twenty-two others maintained.

Ministers maintained

# Ministry of Justice
Laurent Esso
# Ministry of Secondary Education
Prof. Nalova Lyonga
# Ministry of External Relations
Le Jeune Mbella Mbella
# Ministry of Territorial Administration
Paul Atanga Nji
# Ministry of Post and Telecommunications
MINETTE Libom Li Likeng
# Ministry of Finance
Louis Paul Motaze
# Ministry of Defense
Joseph Beti Assomo
# Ministry of Decentralization and Local Development
George Elanga Obam
# Ministry of the Economy ,Planning and Regional Development
Alamine Oumane Mey
# Ministry of Transport
Ernest Ngalle Bibehe
# Ministry of Trade
Luc Magloire Mbarga
# Ministry of Energy and water Resources
Gaston Eloundou Essomba
# Ministry of the Environment, sustainable Development and nature protection
Hele Pierre
# Ministry of Women’s Empowerment and the Family
Therese Abena Ondoa
# Ministry of Labour and Social Security
Prof. Gregoire Owona
# Ministry of Tourism
Maigari Bello Buba
# Ministry of Public Works
Emmanuel Nganou Njoumessi
# Ministry of Scientific Research and Innovation
Madeleine Tchuente
# Ministry of Forestry and Wild Life

Jules Doret Ndongo
# Ministry of Livestock, Fisheries and Animal industries
Dr Taiga

Friday, January 4, 2019

Paul Biya appoints new Prime Minister to replace Philemon Yang


The Cameroon head of state signed a new degree today, 4th of January 2019, appoints Joseph Dion Ngute to replace Philemon Yang as the new prime minister of the government.

Joseph Dion Ngute first statement as prime minister of Republic of Cameroon, watch the video below


See decree of appointment signed by the head of state below




Thursday, January 3, 2019

Accident of Batanga Chief: this is What really happened that leads to death of the couple


On their way to Yaoundé, the couple returned on Wednesday, January 2, 2019 from Kribi where they celebrated with family the holidays of the end of the year 2018 and the new year 2019.

Mahouve Michel, 61-year-old non-hierarchical magistrate and his wife born Ndjekoum Ngounou Julienne were killed in a traffic accident. According to sources, the accident occurred on the Kribi - Yaoundé axis in the late morning of Wednesday, January 2, 2019.

See also:


"Magistrate Mahouve was driving his Prado Land Cruiser with his wife on his right. His car had a head-on collision with a Toyota pick-up. The front of the Prado car, especially the woman's side crumbled. It is to tell you the violence of shock. The woman died on the spot. The husband gave up afterwards, "says a family source.

See also:


The woman teacher and her husband, Director of Non-Repressive Affairs and Seal at the Ministry of Justice, were returning from Kribi where they celebrated the holidays of the end of the year 2018 and the new year 2019.

The judge was also a traditional chief among the Batanga, a great people of Kribi, a seaside town in the Ocean Department, Southern Region.


Source: cameroon-info.net

Wednesday, January 2, 2019

Ambazonia: Buea, Bamenda on a lockdown, deserted atmosphere reported


Deserted atmosphere has been reported in Buea and Bamenda including other major towns.

Markets and Streets in Buea, Bamenda, other major villages towns in the North West and South West regions of Cameroon are reported empty just like on a ghost town day, Everyone is indoors.

See also: Acting President Samuel Sako End of year Address to the nation, watch the video below 


"It is an atmosphere of uncertainty reigning here, no one has left the house since morning" a Buea resident told Mimi Mefo

See also: Ambazonia fighters send warning massage to Paul Biya, watch the video below




Stayed turned..

Paul Biya: 2019 might be hell for the head of state

Paul Eric Kingue determined to completely erase Paul Biya in 2019, as he sends strong massage to Paul Biya during New Year's greetings addressed to Cameroonian.



Paul Eric Kingue, campaign director of the candidate Maurice Kamto in the presidential election of October 7 last does not intend to give any chance to the RDPC of Paul Biya during this year 2019.

See also: Acting President Samuel Sako End of year Address to the nation, watch the video below  



In a message of New Year's greetings addressed to Cameroonian and published on his facekook page, the politician, former mayor of the commune of Njombe Penja said to be radically determined to "work for the eradication and total banishment of the CPDM and its president of the national political scene".


Source: 237actu.com

Man bath with harmful chemical in Mbengwi

Again Cameroon soldiers used dangerous chemical to bath a man in Mbengwi.


Afrinews profile editors desk received again another report of harmful chemical used on a citizen of Mbengwi by Cameroon soldiers.

See also: End of year Address to the nation by Acting President Samuel Sako, Watch the video below



The victim whose name was not given was reportedly attack by the government security forces in Mbengwi on 31st of December, 2018. His crime is yet unknown.

His body is burnt, face disfigured just as you can see in the photo below



Watch video: End of year Address to the nation by Acting President Samuel Sako, Watch the video below