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Tuesday, December 3, 2019

Paul Biya plays with his 'Bamileke creatures' Patrice Nganang

I'm going to explain this gently-softly, because I'm not only Professor of Cultural Studies, I've also practiced this in two of the countries that have most deeply and tragically made stereotypes, Germany with Jews, USA with blacks. The stereotype we are talking about here is a chapter of public representation, and so is different from the racist or tribal jokes that people make: it is a flesh-and-gold being, who lives in mythology of power institutes: Massa Yo is here its manifestation, especially for the Bamileke. As we know, the Bamileke are a people that has always resisted, and as a result they have been divided - there is the West, but also in the Southwest and Northwest.


The resistance of the Bamileke was fierce: against the Bamum, against Islam, against the Germans, against the French. The fierce proof of this resistance is that the organization system of the Bamileke, the tontines, remains intact, untouched, and alive, even if the people are divided. The maquis thus occupied this space of resistance in a natural way, of cultural resistance already in 1945-1950, with Matthias Djoumessi, and of 1958, with the effective maquis of the UPC, whose most explosive face was Kamdem Niyim. You will realize that, with Mathias Djoumessi as with Kamdem Niyim, the tactics of power has been doubled. 

1) Beside the effective liquidation of the rebel Bamileke, the Resistance therefore, with the effective genocide, 

2) the cooptation of these in the power, here rectilinear from 1956-2018. And because of this, Djoumessi and Kamdem Niyim became ministers, before Niyim was executed in the public square. 

But the third tactic was the stereotype of the castrated Bamileke, the one who is the little dog, from whom the people of power make fun, and who plays the game. Racism also invented such a character: the crazy black, who laughs, dance, is therefore in short the humorous arm of racism. Similarly for anti-Semitism. The fun Jew, castrate, submissive, has been the weapon of anti-Semites for many years. So it is with tribalism. He has always invented the zany Bamileke, the Bamileke who is laughed at, and this was done by a play, 'Three suitors, a husband', a piece introduced to the curriculum of public studies, so that every child in this country remember this Bamileke castrate, and play that will have been played everywhere. Of this one is not the public figure who is Co modified, that is to say, repeated by thousands - Massa Batre, played by Bamileke first, but under the instigation of an entirely Bulu production team, and of course Jean Miche Kankan. The constitution of the theatrical character, what in Cultural Studies is called performance of the role, is fundamental here - and racist America has many roles as it has given blacks since 'so much wins the wind'. Black castrate, submissive, laughing, which thus negated the rebellious black - Malcolm X, for example. The transition from theater to the political scene at home has gone from Kankan to Jean Djeuga, candidate for the 2011 presidential election, with Jean de Dieu Momo, stereotype candidate. instigation of an entirely Bulu production team, and of course Jean Miche Kankan. The constitution of the theatrical character, what in Cultural Studies is called performance of the role, is fundamental here - and racist America has many roles as it has given blacks since 'so much wins the wind'. Black castrate, submissive, laughing, which thus negated the rebellious black - Malcolm X, for example. The transition from theater to the political scene at home has gone from Kankan to Jean Djeuga, candidate for the 2011 presidential election, with Jean de Dieu Momo, stereotype candidate. instigation of an entirely Bulu production team, and of course Jean Miche Kankan. The constitution of the theatrical character, what in Cultural Studies is called role performance, is fundamental here - and racist America has many roles as it has given blacks since 'so much wins the wind'. Black castrate, submissive, laughing, which thus negated the rebellious black - Malcolm X, for example. The transition from theater to the political scene at home has gone from Kankan to Jean Djeuga, candidate for the 2011 presidential election, with Jean de Dieu Momo, stereotype candidate. Racist America has many roles as it has given blacks since 'so much wins the wind'. Black castrate, submissive, laughing, which thus negated the rebellious black - Malcolm X, for example. The transition from theater to the political scene at home has gone from Kankan to Jean Djeuga, candidate for the 2011 presidential election, with Jean de Dieu Momo, stereotype candidate. Racist America has many roles as it has given blacks since 'so much wins the wind'. Black castrate, submissive, laughing, which thus negated the rebellious black - Malcolm X, for example. The transition from theater to the political scene at home has gone from Kankan to Jean Djeuga, candidate for the 2011 presidential election, with Jean de Dieu Momo, stereotype candidate.


With Jean de Dieu Momo, the character became a truly political being: Momo became a minister, it is believed, to take the place of Kamto, no. The game of tribal substitution here wants it to take instead the place of what was a stereotype: Jean Djeuga, Jean-Miche Kankan, and of course Tchenguen of 'Three pretenders, a husband'. It happens that the stereotype is as violent as the character who lives his humiliation in the self-denigration. 

The laughter of the republic already formatted by the play 'Three suitors, a husband', play on the program, formatted by Jean-Miche Kankan, popular comedy character, formatted by the 2011 presidential election, found in Momo, which was still a comic potential. And he burst out laughing. He laughs at each of Momo's gestures. He laughs at what Momo does, his approach, his dance, in short, the character that is the stereotype already inscribed in the public culture. Momo shows us for the first time a stereotype that becomes a person in power, because here he comes into the inter-chambers of power, he becomes flesh and bone, he is suddenly alive. 

There is no more historical moment than this one, which suddenly sees an invention become flesh, and the politics of tribal representation have its most complete personification. What remains is what: the violence, because the violence of the self-denigration of Momo, will be externalized in the violence of self-sabotage Bamileke, in violence used against Kamto therefore, in violence. The circle will thus be closed, the one who wanted to transform the violence into a castrate subject would thus reveal his own violence, staged against his own.