Tuesday, October 30, 2018

Ambazonia: Violent and bloody weekend recorded in the English-speaking regions


"At least four civilians have been killed by stray bullets" in clashes between English-speaking secessionists and the Cameroonian army in Nyasoso in the Southwest region, local governor Bernard Okalia Bilai told Anadolu on Monday.

"We also learned that soldiers were killed too, Sunday, in the fighting in Nyasoso, but we have not yet confirmation," says the governor. In the North West region, the commander of the military region reports that at least four men in uniform have died between Friday and Sunday. "A prison guard on duty in Wum was killed by the separatists as he was returning from Bamenda, where he had left to withdraw his salary. A lieutenant was killed Saturday in Nkambe and two young soldiers killed the same day in Ndu ", informs the commander, General Aga Robinson. The Cameroonian officer indicates, moreover, that in another attack, Friday in Esu, three separatists were neutralized and their encampment dismantled.

Read also: Urgent - Exposed: Paul Biya publishes a false letter of congratulations from Macron

Like other villages, this village 120 km from Bamenda, in the North-West region of Cameroon, was a collateral victim of clashes between armed elements suspected of belonging to English-speaking separatist groups and the defense forces. and Cameroonian security. And civilian populations accuse the army of committing abuses. "Soldiers are arresting young people suspected of belonging to the secessionist movement. Those arrested are sequestrated, beaten and their homes burned, "said Esu village resident John Eweh, affected by the fighting. "The army has done its job professionally and with respect for human rights. The army is there to protect the nation and civilian populations against terrorists, "defends Colonel Didier Badjeck, spokesman for the Cameroonian army.

Read also:  Anglophone Crisis: Paul Biya refuses the release of Sisiku Ayuk and Co

As a reminder, at least 60 Cameroonian soldiers and more than 500 civilians have been killed in the English-speaking regions since the outbreak of the so-called Anglophone crisis in late 2016, according to the Network of Human Rights Defenders of Central Africa (Redhac). The Anglophone crisis, born of the frustration and resentment of the English-speaking population vis-à-vis the Yaoundé regime, has turned into a security crisis that has led to the displacement of 180,000 people since December 2017 according to the UNHCR.


Source: beninwebtv.com